Dyson unveils purifying headphones to protect from air and noise pollution

31 March 2022, 08:52

The Dyson Zone air-purifying headphones
EC_571_HeroImage_JaniceDarkWorld. Picture: PA

The company’s first wearable device combines noise-cancelling headphones with a unique air-purifying system that projects filtered air to the user.

Dyson has created headphones that include a purifying visor designed to help people avoid polluted air in cities.

Called the Dyson Zone, the wearable device combines noise-cancelling over-ear headphones with a visor that sits just in front of the nose and mouth, delivering filtered air.

The British technology firm said the headphones have been created in response to growing concerns about air and sound pollution in urban areas.

It cited World Health Organisation (WHO) figures estimating nine in 10 people globally breathe air that exceeds its guidelines on pollutant limits, while around 100 million people in Europe are said to be exposed to long-term noise exposure above its recommended level.

The headphones are the result of six years’ development and more than 500 prototypes, Dyson said.

Compressors in each ear draw air through built-in filters and project two streams of purified air to the wearer’s nose and mouth through the visor.

The visor can be lowered when the wearer is speaking or detached completely when not in use.

The Dyson Zone air-purifying headphones
The Dyson Zone comes with a detachable visor which, when attached, streams purified air to the wearer’s nose and mouth (Dyson/PA)

Dyson said the headphones will go on sale in the autumn. A price has yet to be confirmed.

“Air pollution is a global problem – it affects us everywhere we go,” Jake Dyson, the company’s chief engineer, said.

“In our homes, at school, at work and as we travel, whether on foot, on a bike or by public or private transport.

“The Dyson Zone purifies the air you breathe on the move. And unlike face masks, it delivers a plume of fresh air without touching your face, using high-performance filters and two miniaturised air pumps.

“After six years in development, we’re excited to deliver pure air and pure audio, anywhere.”

By Press Association

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