French Senate votes to ban headscarves from sports competitions

19 January 2022, 11:54

Paris 2024 signage (Mike Egerton/PA)
Paris 2024 signage (Mike Egerton/PA). Picture: PA

It is unclear whether the ban would be implemented for the 2024 Paris Olympics.

The French Senate has voted in favour of banning the wearing of headscarves in sports competitions, arguing that neutrality is a requirement on the field of play.

The French upper legislative house voted late Tuesday in favour of amending a proposed law stipulating that the wearing “of conspicuous religious symbols is prohibited” to take part in events and competitions organized by sports federations.

In their text, senators clearly said that the amendment aims at banning “the wearing of the veil in sports competitions”.

They added that headscarves can put at risk the safety of athletes wearing it when they practice their discipline.

The amendment proposed by right-wing group Les Republicains and opposed by the French government was adopted with 160 votes in favour, and 143 against.

A commission composed of members from the Senate and the lower house should now gather to find a compromise on the text before it is published, meaning the amendment can still be erased.

It is unclear whether the ban would be implemented for the 2024 Paris Olympics.

French President Emmanuel Macron (Yves Herman/PA)
French President Emmanuel Macron (Yves Herman/PA)

The Olympic organising committee did not immediately answer a request for comment.

The vote came a year after politicians in the French parliament’s lower house approved a bill to strengthen oversight of mosques, schools and sports clubs in a bid to safeguard France from radical Islamists and to promote respect for French values, one of President Emmanuel Macron’s landmark projects.

With France bloodied by terror attacks, few disagree that radicalisation is a danger.

But critics also see the law as a political ploy to lure the right wing to Mr Macron’s centrist party ahead of this year’s presidential election.

In their amendment, senators said that every citizen is free to exercise his or her religion, but insisted that one should refrain from putting forward his differences.

“Today, there is legal uncertainty about the wearing of religious symbols, and it is necessary for the state to clearly define the rules,” the amendment voted by senators read.

“If the wearing of the veil is not explicitly forbidden, we could see the emergence of community sports clubs promoting certain religious signs.”

The French Football Federation already bans women from wearing headscarves in official matches, as well as at competitions it organises.

By Press Association

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