Closely fought German election ushers in post-Merkel era

26 September 2021, 11:24

Election campaign billboards of candidates for chancellery Annalena Baerbock, Olaf Scholz and Armin Laschet displayed in central Berlin
Germany Election. Picture: PA

Polls point to a very close race between the centre-right Union bloc and the centre-left Social Democrats.

German voters are choosing a new parliament in an election that will determine who succeeds Chancellor Angela Merkel after her 16 years at the helm of Europe’s biggest economy.

Polls point to a very close race on Sunday between Mrs Merkel’s centre-right Union bloc, with state governor Armin Laschet running for chancellor, and the centre-left Social Democrats, for whom outgoing finance minister and vice chancellor Olaf Scholz is seeking the top job.

Recent surveys show the Social Democrats marginally ahead.

The environmentalist Greens, with candidate Annalena Baerbock, are making their first run for the chancellery, and polls say they are several points behind in third place.

Social Democratic Party candidate for chancellor Olaf Scholz casts his vote for the German parliament election in Potsdam, Berlin
Social Democratic Party candidate for chancellor Olaf Scholz casts his vote for the German parliament election in Potsdam (Michael Kappeler/dpa via AP)

The Social Democrats have been boosted by Mr Scholz’s relative popularity after a long poll slump.

Ms Baerbock suffered from early gaffes and Mr Laschet, the governor of North Rhine-Westphalia state, has struggled to motivate his party’s traditional base.

About 60.4 million people in the nation of 83 million are eligible to elect the new Bundestag, or lower house of parliament, which will elect the next head of government.

No party is expected to come anywhere near an outright majority, with polls showing support for all of them below 30%.

Such a result could mean that many governing coalitions are mathematically possible, and trigger weeks or months of haggling to form a new government.

Armin Laschet, Christian Union parties candidate for chancellery and minister president of North Rhine-Westphalia, and his wife Susanne cast their votes for the German parliament election in Aachen
Armin Laschet and his wife Susanne cast their votes for the German parliament election in Aachen (Thilo Schmuelgen/Pool via AP)

Until it is in place, Mrs Merkel will remain in office on a caretaker basis.

Mr Scholz said as he voted in Potsdam, just outside Berlin, that he hopes voters “will make possible … a very strong result for the Social Democrats, and that citizens will give me the mandate to become the next chancellor of Germany”.

Mr Laschet said in Aachen, on Germany’s western border, that the election “will decide on Germany’s direction in the coming years, and so it will come down to every vote”.

Mrs Merkel has won plaudits for steering Germany through several major crises.

The new chancellor will have to tend the recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, which Germany so far has weathered relatively well thanks to large rescue programmes that have incurred new debt.

Chancellor Angela Merkel and Armin Laschet, top candidate for the upcoming election, wave to supporters at the final election campaign event of the Christian Democratic Party in Aachen, Germany
Chancellor Angela Merkel and candidate Armin Laschet wave to supporters at the final election campaign event of the Christian Democratic Party in Aachen (Martin Meissner/AP)

Mr Laschet insists there should be no tax increases as Germany pulls out of the pandemic.

Mr Scholz and Ms Baerbock favour tax hikes for the richest Germans, and also back an increase in the minimum wage.

On Friday, Mr Scholz touted the outgoing government’s success in preserving jobs during the pandemic, declaring that “we are succeeding in avoiding the major economic and social crisis that otherwise would have hit us”.

“We will achieve new growth if we do the right thing now in economic policy,” Mr Laschet said at a rally on Saturday in his home city of Aachen.

“If we do it wrong now, with ideological experiments, everything that we have built up in 16 years will be squandered.”

Mrs Merkel, making the last of only a handful of appearances in this campaign, praised Mr Laschet as someone who “builds bridges, takes people along with him”.

Germany’s leading parties have significant differences in their proposals for tackling climate change.

Candidate for the Green Party Annalena Baerbock speaks at an election campaign event in Wuerzburg, Germany
Candidate for the Green Party Annalena Baerbock speaks at an election campaign event in Wuerzburg (Nicolas Armer/dpa via AP)

Mr Laschet’s Union bloc is pinning its hopes on technological solutions and a market-driven approach, while the Greens want to ramp up carbon prices and end the use of coal earlier than planned.

Mr Scholz has emphasised the need to protect jobs as Germany transitions to greener energy.

Foreign policy has not featured much in the campaign, though the Greens favour a tougher stance towards China and Russia.

As they have struggled in the polls, Mr Laschet and other Union leaders have warned that Mr Scholz and the Greens would form a coalition with the opposition Left Party, which opposes Nato and German military deployments abroad.

Whether such a partnership is realistic is questionable, given foreign policy and other differences between the parties, but that line of attack may help turn out the conservative base.

Mr Scholz has said he would like a two-party coalition with the Greens, but that looks very optimistic.

Absent a majority for that, his first choice would probably be an alliance with the Greens and the pro-business Free Democrats.

A coalition with those two parties is also Mr Laschet’s likeliest route to power.

People pass election posters of the three candidates for German chancellor in Gelsenkirchen, Germany
People pass election posters of the three candidates for German chancellor in Gelsenkirchen (Martin Meissner/AP)

The Greens favour an alliance with the Social Democrats, while the Free Democrats prefer one with the Union.

The result may also allow a repeat of the outgoing “grand coalition” of the traditional big parties, the Union and Social Democrats, under either Mr Scholz or Mr Laschet.

The far-right Alternative for Germany party is polling a little below the 12.6% it won to enter parliament in 2017, but will not feature in any new government this time either.

All other parties say they will not work with it.

The Bundestag has at least 598 seats, but Germany’s complex voting system means that it can be considerably larger.

The outgoing parliament had a record 709 seats and the new one is widely expected to be even bigger.

The number of people voting by postal ballot is expected to be higher than the 28.6% who did so four years ago.

Also on Sunday, voters in Berlin and in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania in north-eastern Germany – both states currently led by the Social Democrats – are electing new state legislatures.

By Press Association

Latest World News

See more Latest World News

Earthshot 2021

Revealed: List of winners awarded £1million by Duke of Cambridge for Earthshot Prize 2021

Millionaire Robert Durst is believed to have killed three people.

Millionaire murderer on ventilator with Covid days after sentencing

Former PM Gordon Brown wants to send over a billion vaccines to low-income countries

Gordon Brown calls for emergency vaccine airlift to poorer nations

The US has "no idea" how the Chinese managed to make such progress on hypersonic missiles

China fires hypersonic missile around globe before striking target

A British Airways plane takes off as the resumption of UK – US flights was confirmed

UK – US flights to resume from 8 November after 19-month ban

Officers arrested the suspect after 30 minutes

Norway bow and arrow attack 'appears to be act of terror' as five killed

Police in Florida arrested the man on Tuesday

Man arrested after toddler found gun and shot mother dead during work Zoom call

Police officers cordon off the scene in Kongsberg

Five people killed after man goes on bow and arrow rampage in Norwegian town

Billy Hood has been jailed for 25 years

London football coach jailed for 25 years in Dubai over cannabis oil found in car

Blue Origin Launch.

Lift off! William Shatner soars into orbit on Blue Origin rocket

William Shatner take part in New Shepard spacecraft crew

Watch: William Shatner blasts off into space

Pen Farthing had staff and animals from his charity Nowzad evacuated from Afghanistan

Pen Farthing talks of 'total relief' as charity staff are flown into UK

Superman comes out as bisexual in DC's latest comic book.

Superman comes out as bisexual in DC's new comic book series

The northern flank of the volcano collapsed over the weekend, triggering new lava flows.

La Palma volcano partially collapses, spewing 'explosive bombs' of molten rock

Fuel stations and power plants in Lebanon have been forced to close.

Energy crisis: Warnings of blackouts in India and China and gas prices soar in Europe

Gerald Darmanin said "not one euro has been paid" of the promised £54m the UK promised to France to help prevent migrant crossings

'Not one euro paid' of money promised to France to tackle migrant crossings - minister