Toughest job interview questions revealed

30 January 2020, 00:19

The most bizarre job interview questions have been revealed
The most bizarre job interview questions have been revealed. Picture: PA
Nick Hardinges

By Nick Hardinges

Some of the most bizarre job interview questions have been revealed, according to jobs site Glassdoor.

The prospect of going to a job interview can be extremely daunting, no matter how much preparation you have done.

You might try and learn the entire history of the company you are applying for, or find a way to turn some of your biggest weaknesses into strengths.

However, employers are beginning to ask more and more bizarre questions that may not seem immediately relevant to the interview, or so say the people at the jobs site Glassdoor.

Job interviews can be daunting, but good answers to bizarre questions could help
Job interviews can be daunting, but good answers to bizarre questions could help. Picture: PA

But people should not be fearful of these seemingly complex questions, as they "rarely have right or wrong answers."

One question that is being increasingly used in job interview is "two truths and a lie."

The idea behind this is for the candidate to provide two statements about them that are true, and one thing that is a lie.

The employer will then attempt to figure out which statement is the lie.

These kinds of questions can give employers a better insight into how a candidate's mind works and how they react under pressure.

Tough interview questions can help determine whether someone will fit into a team
Tough interview questions can help determine whether someone will fit into a team. Picture: PA

They can also be quite humorous and help an employer establish whether the prospective employee will fit into their team.

Other examples include:

- If you won £10 million, what would you do with it?
- How many windows do you think there are in London?
- Is a Jaffa Cake a cake or a biscuit?
- How do your friends describe you?
- Design a car park.

John Lamphiere of Glassdoor, said: "Employers continue to push the boundaries with hiring practices, presenting candidates with obscure questions and challenges to test their thought process and problem-solving aptitude.

"These questions rarely have right or wrong answers, rather employers are looking to understand candidates' cognitive strengths, reactions under pressure and how they may fit into the existing team."

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