Apple delays debut of anti-tracking tool in iPhone software

4 September 2020, 07:54

Apple
Apple-Privacy Feature-Delayed. Picture: PA

The iOS 14 system is expected to be released as a free software upgrade to roughly a billion iPhone users later this month.

Apple is delaying a new privacy feature in the next version of its iPhone operating system that will make it more difficult for app makers to track people online to help sell digital ads.

The decision affects iOS 14, which is expected to be released as a free software upgrade to roughly a billion iPhone users later this month.

Apple intended iOS 14 to automatically block tracking as soon as it came out, but the company now says it will hold back the tool until early next year.

The safeguard was also supposed be in the next operating systems for iPads and Apple TVs.

The feature would require apps to explicitly ask users to give permission to collect and share data about their online behaviour through a unique code that identifies every iPhone.

That requirement raised fears that most people would block the tracking, making it more difficult for free apps to sell the ads that generate most of their revenue.

Apps are currently automatically given a tracking code unless users of Apple devices go to the extra trouble of changing their privacy controls on their own.

Facebook, which runs the largest digital ad network behind Google, last week warned that the new privacy feature in iOS 14 threatened to deliver a major blow to many apps at a time they are struggling amid a coronavirus-triggered recession.

Apple said the delay should not be interpreted as a sign it is backing down from its commitment to protect the privacy of its customers as a “fundamental right”.

“We want to give developers the time they need to make the necessary changes” to apps and advertising models, the company said in a statement.

Apple’s postponement disappointed those trying to combat the digital surveillance inherent in online tracking, said Craig Danuloff, chief executive of the Privacy Co, which recently introduced its own privacy app to help protect iPhone users from prying eyes.

“One can only see this delay as harming millions of users who do not at all understand the level of tracking that’s going on,” he said.

By Press Association

More Technology News

See more More Technology News

Jack Ritchie inquest

Online slot games ‘highly addictive’ despite new limits, say bereaved parents

The Spotify app is shown in an Apple iPad mini

Apple hits out at Spotify over ongoing EU competition complaint

Serco signage

Serco Leisure ordered to stop using facial recognition tech on workers

Smartphone and credit card

New maximum online slots stakes ‘a landmark moment’ for gambling reform

Undated file photo of the Google homepage (PA)

Google ‘working to fix’ AI picture bot after inaccuracy row

Valeria Kovtun

AI is amplifying online disinformation, says Ukrainian media specialist

A mobile phone next to a telecoms mast

Government’s rural 4G programme behind schedule, report warns

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak

Sunak touts gigabit broadband rollout on ‘levelling up tour’ of North Wales

John McCarthy

‘Transformative’ effect of AI on Irish workforce examined by Government

Apple phone

Apple launches free Sports app for following live scores

Culture, Media and Sport Committee

BBC soaps can be made with AI in three to five years, MPs hear

A woman using a laptop computer

New online safety law may disappoint public without ‘tangible’ change, say MPs

Cyber attacks

Generative AI and elections are key focus for hackers in 2024, report warns

A mobile phone

Parents need to look at own phone ‘addiction’, says Children’s Commissioner

LockBit

Major ransomware site taken down in international law enforcement sting

Tinder dating app

Tinder brings ID verification to the UK