Joe Biden calls Donald Trump 'most incompetent president in US history'

8 January 2021, 20:43 | Updated: 8 January 2021, 22:07

Joe Biden called Donald Trump 'the most incompetent president in history'
Joe Biden called Donald Trump 'the most incompetent president in history'. Picture: PA

By Maddie Goodfellow

President-elect Joe Biden has called Donald Trump 'the most incompetent president in US history' and said he is 'not fit to serve'.

It comes after Donald Trump said he will not be going to Joe Biden's Inauguration, tweeting on Friday: "To all of those who have asked, I will not be going to the Inauguration".

Responding to the US president's announcement that he would not be going to the inauguration, Mr Biden said it was a "good thing".

He said the response was 'one of a few things he and the incumbent president agreed on'.

He then went on to say that Mr Trump had "embarrassed" the US around the world and was "not fit to serve".

"He has exceeded even my worst notions about him," said Mr Biden.

It comes as representatives are said to be planning an impeachment against President Trump.

Representatives Raskin, Lieu, Cicilline are planning to introduce an "Incitement of insurrection" on Monday, reports suggest.

Donald Trump has said he will not attend the Inauguration
Donald Trump has said he will not attend the Inauguration. Picture: PA

It is the first time in 152 years that a US President has refused to attend their successor's inaugural ceremony, and Barack Obama attended Trump's in 2017.

There have only been three US President's in history who refused to attend the following one - John Adams in 1801, John Quincy Adams in 1829 and Andrew Johnson in 1869.

Trump's announcement comes as calls grow for his impeachment or to be ousted from the Oval Office early after he encouraged his followers to storm the Capitol in Washington DC.

It is believed Vice President Mike Pence will still be attending the Inaguration.

Earlier on Friday, Nancy Pelosi today called Trump an "unstable president" and said she was seeking advice on how to prevent Trump from accessing the codes for a nuclear strike.

In a statement she said: “This morning, I spoke to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley to discuss available precautions for preventing an unstable president from initiating military hostilities or accessing the launch codes and ordering a nuclear strike. “

Ms Pelosi and Democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer have called on Vice President Mike Pence and the Cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment to force President Trump from office.

It is a process for stripping the president of his post and installing the vice president to take over.

President Trump is set to leave on January 20 when Mr Biden is inaugurated.

President Trump could be prevented from running again in 2024 or ever holding the presidency again. He would be the only president to be impeached twice.

The House impeached him in late 2019, but the Republican-led Senate acquitted him in early 2020.

Democrats are discussing acting quickly to impeach President Trump as soon as next week if his Cabinet does not first try to remove him.

Most Democrats, and many Republicans, put the blame squarely on President Trump after hundreds of protesters bearing Trump flags and clothing broke into the Capitol and caused destruction and mass evacuations.

On Friday, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau said that US President Donald Trump incited an assault on democracy by violent rioters - a rare direct criticism of Mr Trump by him.

Mr Trudeau has been careful not to criticise Mr Trump over the last four years as 75% of Canada's exports go to the US, but Mr Trudeau told reporters on Friday that Mr Trump and other politicians are to blame for an event he called "shocking, deeply disturbing, and frankly saddening".

"What we witnessed was an assault on democracy by violent rioters, incited by the current president and other politicians," Mr Trudeau said on Friday.

He said that democracy is not automatic, it takes work every day, and that it is a real accomplishment to have a political system in which the losing side gracefully concedes.

But Mr Trudeau said democracy is resilient in the US, Canada's closest ally.

Mr Trudeau said Canadians expect "debate that is grounded in shared acceptance of the facts".

Asked if he worries his comments could damage relations with Republicans, Mr Trudeau said: "It's extremely important that we be there to defend democracy.

"Words have consequences.

"Choices made by people in power can have direct impact on behaviours and institutions," he added.

Mr Trudeau and Mr Trump have largely got along, but Mr Trump previously called Mr Trudeau "weak" and "dishonest."

And Mr Trump vowed to make Canada pay after Mr Trudeau said he would not be bullied in trade talks.

Mr Trump threatened tariffs on cars and imposed them on steel and aluminium.