'Don't ask for pay rises' Bank boss warns despite 'apocalyptic' food price rises

17 May 2022, 00:18 | Updated: 17 May 2022, 08:39

Andrew Bailey has issued a stark warning about food price rises
Andrew Bailey has issued a stark warning about food price rises. Picture: Alamy

By Daisy Stephens

The Governor of the Bank of England has warned there is "very real income shock" coming from energy prices and "apocalyptic" food prices but stood by the Bank's policy decisions.

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Andrew Bailey said he felt "helpless" as he defended the bank of England's monetary policy despite households being battered by soaring inflation.

He also doubled down on his claim that workers should not be demanding big pay rises. Mr Bailey, who earns £570,000 a year, told MPs that big earners should 'think and reflect' before asking for large salary increases to help curb rising inflation.

Mr Bailey told MPs at the Treasury Select Committee on Monday that UK consumer demand will be impacted by current inflation, which is the highest in 30 years, and this is expected to cause higher unemployment.

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The Office for National statistics recorded inflation at 7 per cent in March and later this week is expected to unveil over 8 per cent inflation for last month.

The Bank of England has said inflation is likely to peak at 10.25 per cent during the final quarter of 2022.

"The main driver of inflation and what brings it down is the very big, real income shock which is coming from outside forces and, particularly, energy prices and global goods prices," Mr Bailey told MPs.

"That will have an impact on domestic demand and it will dampen activity, and I'm afraid it looks like it will increase unemployment."

Mr Bailey issued the warning to the Treasury Select Committee on Monday
Mr Bailey issued the warning to the Treasury Select Committee on Monday. Picture: Alamy

Mr Bailey, who himself earns more than £500,000 a year, has previously fallen under fire for telling Brits not to ask for a pay rise to avoid driving inflation up further.

Weeks later he was criticised for not remembering exactly how much he was paid, saying "I don't carry that [information] around in my head".

He told the committee on Monday that "we are walking a very narrow path" between surging inflation and risks to growth.

The Governor stressed that the war in Ukraine has resulted in an unpredictable jump in inflation, highlighting that there is still a "major worry" over further rises in food prices due to the conflict.

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"The Ukrainian finance minister said is that there is food in store but they can't get it out," he told MPs.

"While he was optimistic about crop planting, as a major supplier of wheat and cooking oil, he said we have no way of shipping it out and that is getting worse.

"It is a major worry for this country and a major worry for the developing world.

"Sorry for being apocalyptic but that is a major concern."

The Governor said there was "major worry" over further rises in food prices due to the conflict in Ukraine
The Governor said there was "major worry" over further rises in food prices due to the conflict in Ukraine. Picture: Alamy

In March, UK food inflation increased by 5.9 per cent and is expected to accelerate in the coming months.

Michael Saunders, who sits on the Bank's monetary policy committee, said he believes tighter monetary policy would have done little to alter the current rate of inflation.

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Mr Bailey also told MPs that he does not think the Bank "could have done anything differently" to avoid sharp price rises.

"There have been a series of supply shocks, most recently with the impact of the war - Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

"We can't predict things like wars - that's not in anybody's power."