Euro 2020 final: Wembley tickets available for £70k per pair hours ahead of match

11 July 2021, 12:17

Euro 2020 final tickets to see England v Italy at Wembley are being sold for £70,000 per pair on eBay.
Euro 2020 final tickets to see England v Italy at Wembley are being sold for £70,000 per pair on eBay. Picture: PA/LBC screenshot

By Joe Cook

Ticket touts are making the most of England's historic match against Italy in the Euro 2020 final tonight, with tickets being resold for up to £35,000 each.

With just hours to go until fans arrive for the 8pm kickoff at Wembley, multiple sites have hundreds of tickets for sale.

On resale sites Ticombo and LiveFootball Tickets, tickets range from £1,622 to £15,000 each.

LBC could not verify whether the tickets are genuine, but between 11am and 11.30am at least 50 tickets appeared to be sold, according to the sites' numbers of available tickets.

Read more: 'We're in a final and we're here to win': Southgate's message to Italy

Read more: Prince William 'can't believe this is happening' as England gear up for Euros final

Tickets were also available on Sunday morning on eBay for £35,000 each, while on Facebook Marketplace one seller offered a pair of tickets for £7000.

Resale site Live Football Tickets claimed to have up over 600 Wembley tickets for sale on Sunday morning.
Resale site Live Football Tickets claimed to have up over 600 Wembley tickets for sale on Sunday morning. Picture: Live Football Tickets/LBC screenshot

Prices for the Euro 2020 championships have already been criticised for their high cost, with original final ticket costs ranging from £82 to £808.

But in some cases these are now being sold at a markup of 1665%, with touts standing to make £28,300 on a paid of tickets.

Read more: England fans can get a last-minute jab at Wembley drop-in, says NHS's top doctor

Tickets for the final were available for £15,000 each on resale site Ticombo just hours before kickoff.
Tickets for the final were available for £15,000 each on resale site Ticombo just hours before kickoff. Picture: Ticombo/LBC screenshot
One eBay seller said they would wanted £70,000 for a pair of tickets.
One eBay seller said they would wanted £70,000 for a pair of tickets. Picture: Ebay/LBC screenshot

Consumer rights site Which? has urged people to avoid unofficial ticket sellers.

"Even though some of these websites claim to offer tickets from '100%' trusted sellers, this is often not the case," Which? expert Adam French said.

"If you're not lucky enough to get your hands on a ticket through the official website you might be better off saving your cash and making plans to watch Gareth Southgate and the lads take on Italy with family and friends at home or in the pub.

"If you insist on trying your luck and buying tickets for the match from an unofficial seller, make sure to pay with a credit card for purchases over £100 so you stand a better chance of getting a refund if things go wrong."

Read more: England's road from the 1966 final to the cusp of Euro 2020 glory

Read more: Gareth Southgate now more popular than Churchill as odds slashed on knighthood

UEFA have also warned that their terms and conditions prevent "unauthorised resale and transfer" and those buying second-hand tickets may not be admitted.

“Uefa will not hesitate to take action (including cancelling tickets) where such unauthorised offers are identified and take legal proceedings against third parties involved in the unauthorised resale of tickets, as we have done in the past," a spokesperson said.

LBC has contacted eBay, Ticombo and LiveFootball Tickets for comment.

The huge resale prices come as Labour calls for a price cap to be included in any joint UK/Ireland bid for the 2030 World Cup, as tickets for Sunday's Euro 2020 final topped thousands of pounds.

Labour's shadow secretary of state for digital, culture, media and sport, Jo Stevens, said: "England's success in this tournament has made us all proud and shown again how much joy football can bring.

"Sadly ticket prices have been outrageous, pricing out genuine fans.

"As we bid for 2030, we must make it affordable to watch the World Cup on home soil for the first time since 1966. Let's bring football home."

The party said that when England won the World Cup in 1966, an average weekly wage would have been enough to buy 40 tickets to the final.