Prince Harry loses High Court challenge over taxpayer funded police protection when he visits the UK

28 February 2024, 11:10 | Updated: 28 February 2024, 13:16

The Duke of Sussex took legal action against the Home Office over a decision in 2020 to change the level of his personal security
The Duke of Sussex took legal action against the Home Office over a decision in 2020 to change the level of his personal security. Picture: Alamy

By Asher McShane

The Duke of Sussex has lost a legal challenge against the Home Office over his right to automatic police protection in the UK.

Listen to this article

Loading audio...

Harry’s legal team argued he had been singled out and treated “less favourably” than other royals when he was denied the right to automatic police protection in the UK.

Immediately after the ruling lawyers for Harry said he plans to appeal.

But the Government argued Harry’s claim should be dismissed, arguing the Executive Committee for the Protection of Royalty and Public Figures (Ravec), which falls under the Home Office, was entitled to conclude the Duke’s protection should be “bespoke” and considered on a “case-by-case” basis.

Harry sued the Home Office after it refused to spend taxpayers’ money on him after he left the royal family.

A decision was reached this morning that there had been no ‘unlawfulness’ in the decisions made by the Home Office to pull Harry’s security.

Read more: ‘A great man’: Royals mourn death of Lady Gabriella Windsor's husband Thomas Kingston after his sudden death at 45

Read more: Nick Ferrari cuts off minister who refuses to answer his questions nine times over Lee Anderson's 'Islamophobic remarks'

Prince Harry pictured leaving the High Court after a hearing about his phone hacking case (file image)
Prince Harry pictured leaving the High Court after a hearing about his phone hacking case (file image). Picture: Alamy

A statement read: "The court has found that there has not been any unlawfulness in reaching the decision of 28 February 2020.

"Any departure from policy was justified. The decision was not irrational.

"The decision was not marred by procedural unfairness. Even if such
procedural unfairness occurred, the court would in any event be prevented from granting the claimant relief.

"This is because, leaving aside any such unlawfulness, it is highly likely that the outcome for the claimant would not have been substantially
different."

"The court has also found that there has been no unlawfulness on the part of RAVEC in respect of its arrangements for certain of the claimant’s visits to Great Britain, following the decision of 28 February 2020."

A Home Office spokesperson said: “We are pleased that the Court has found in favour of the Government’s position in this case, and we are carefully considering our next steps. It would be inappropriate to comment further”.

“The UK Government’s protective security system is rigorous and proportionate. It is our long-standing policy not to provide detailed information on those arrangements, as doing so could compromise their integrity and affect individuals’ security”.

The Sussexes were stripped of their protection when they stepped back from royal duties in 2020.

In December, Home Office lawyers told the High Court Prince Harry would still have publicly-funded police security, but these would be "bespoke arrangements, specifically tailored to him", rather than the automatic security provided for full-time working royals.

A legal spokesperson for the Duke of Sussex said: “The Duke of Sussex will appeal today’s judgment which refuses his judicial review claim against the decision-making body Ravec, which includes the Home Office, the Royal Household and the Met Police.

“Although these are not labels used by Ravec, three categories – as revealed during the litigation – comprise the ‘Ravec cohort’: the Role Based Category, the Occasional Category and the Other VIP Category.

“The Duke is not asking for preferential treatment, but for a fair and lawful application of Ravec’s own rules, ensuring that he receives the same consideration as others in accordance with Ravec’s own written policy.

“In February 2020, Ravec failed to apply its written policy to the Duke of Sussex and excluded him from a particular risk analysis.

“The duke’s case is that the so-called ‘bespoke process’ that applies to him, is no substitute for that risk analysis.

“The Duke of Sussex hopes he will obtain justice from the Court of Appeal, and makes no further comment while the case is ongoing.”

More Latest News

See more More Latest News

The Rwanda Bill has finally passed through parliament.

Victory for Rishi Sunak as Rwanda Bill to become law ending months of parliamentary deadlock

Britain is to announce a fresh £500million funding package for Ukraine on Tuesday.

Britain gives £500m bumper aid package of drones, ammo and missiles to Ukraine ahead of ‘difficult summer’

Rebel Wilson claims a British royal invited her to a drug-fuelled orgy in her upcoming memoir.

Rebel Wilson claims member of the Royal family 'invited her to drug-fuelled orgy' in upcoming bombshell memoir

Donald Trump accused of orchestrating 'criminal scheme to corrupt 2016 election' on first day of hush money trial

Donald Trump accused of orchestrating 'criminal scheme to corrupt 2016 election' on first day of hush money trial

Tom Holland has given an update on Spider-Man 4

'We have a legacy to protect': Tom Holland breaks silence over Spider-Man 4 progress

Volodymyr Zelensky

Biden will send Ukraine weapons once Senate approves aid package, says Zelensky

Exclusive
The events manager at The Black Dog remained tight-lipped on the specifics but admitted they have a 'blonde regular'.

The Black Dog pub referenced in Taylor Swift song ‘does have a certain blonde regular’, admits events manager

Trump Hush Money

Trump tried to ‘corrupt’ 2016 election, prosecution alleges

Brian Field

Schoolboy murderer Brian Field dies behind bars 50 years after he abducted and killed child

Aharon Haliva

Israeli military intelligence chief resigns over failure to prevent Hamas attack

Trump Hush Money

Trump’s £140m bond settled with cash promise

Trump Hush Money

Trump tried to ‘corrupt’ 2016 election, prosecution alleges

Teacher pretended she had Covid after killing boyfriend to use fake isolation time to bury body in garden

Primary school teacher pretended she had Covid after killing boyfriend to use fake isolation time to bury body in garden

Exclusive
Calls for Sir Mark Rowley to resign are 'nonsense', LBC has been told.

Calls for Met Chief Mark Rowley to resign are ‘nonsense and dangerous’, antisemitism tsar tells LBC after protest row

Estate agent accused of murdering fiancee 'found naked, face up in a pool of blood' in Surrey hotel room

Estate agent accused of murdering fiancee 'found naked, face up in a pool of blood' in Surrey hotel room

China Floods

Heavy rainstorms kill four people in southern China