Surge in gang violence sees more than 53,000 flee Haiti’s capital in three weeks

3 April 2024, 08:14

Children line up to receive food in Haiti
Haiti Violence. Picture: PA

The exodus began shortly after powerful gangs launched a series of attacks on government institutions at the end of February.

More than 53,000 people have fled Haiti’s capital in less than three weeks, the vast majority to escape unrelenting gang violence, according to a United Nations report.

More than 60% are headed to Haiti’s rural southern region, which worries UN officials.

“Our humanitarian colleagues emphasised that these departments do not have sufficient infrastructure, and host communities do not have sufficient resources, to cope with the large number of people fleeing Port-au-Prince,” said UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric.

The southern region already hosts more than 116,000 Haitians who previously left Port-au-Prince, according to the report by the UN’s International Organisation for Migration.

An armoured police car patrols an area in Port-au-Prince, Haiti
An armoured police vehicle patrols an area in Port-au-Prince, Haiti (Odelyn Joseph/AP)

The exodus from the capital of some three million people began shortly after powerful gangs launched a series of attacks on government institutions at the end of February.

Gunmen have burned police stations, opened fire on the main international airport that remains closed and stormed Haiti’s two biggest prisons, releasing more than 4,000 inmates.

More than 1,500 people have been reported killed up to March 22, and another 17,000 have been left homeless, according to the UN.

Among the rare travellers trying to head north instead of south from the capital were Marjorie Michelle-Jean, a 42-year-old street vendor, and her two children, aged four and seven.

“I want to see them alive,” she said, explaining that stray bullets keep hitting the tin roof of their home. Last week, they tried twice to travel to her hometown of Mirebalais in central Haiti but were forced to turn back because of roadblocks.

“I will definitely try again,” she said. “It’s absolutely not safe in Port-au-Prince.”

Prime Minister Ariel Henry
Prime Minister Ariel Henry said he would resign once a transitional presidential council is created (Andrew Kasuku/AP)

Of the 53,125 people who fled Port-au-Prince from March 8-27, nearly 70% already had been forced to abandon their homes and were living with relatives or in crowded and unsanitary makeshift shelters across the capital, the UN found.

More than 90% of Haitians leaving the capital have been crowding into buses, risking travel through gang-controlled territory where gang rapes have been reported and gunmen have been known to open fire on public transport.

The violence forced Prime Minister Ariel Henry to announce last month that he would resign once a transitional presidential council is created.

Mr Henry was in Kenya to push for the UN-backed deployment of a police force from the East African country when the attacks began, and he remains locked out of Haiti.

The transitional council, which will be responsible for choosing a new prime minister and council of ministers, has yet to be formally established.

Meanwhile, the mass migration from Port-au-Prince is expected to continue.

By Press Association

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