Ex-Junior Doctor Describes Stress Of Working On The NHS Frontline

29 August 2018, 14:07 | Updated: 29 August 2018, 14:15

Adam Kay, a former doctor turned writer, told James O'Brien he left his job because he couldn't cope with the emotional baggage.

The former doctor spoke about the current exodus of medical professionals leaving their jobs because of the pressure.

Adam told James: "I can't look on Facebook or Twitter that you know saying no brilliant doctors you know leaving their profession to leaving the country joining the city become a teacher

"I know one doctor who's in the middle of becoming a fireman - imagine a world where being a firefighter is a less stressful existence than being a doctor."

When James asked Adam what had changed, he replied: "The key thing is the amount of money in the system and less resources means a crisis in recruitment and a crisis in retention.

Ex-Junior Doctor Describes Stress Of Working On The NHS Frontline
Ex-Junior Doctor Describes Stress Of Working On The NHS Frontline. Picture: LBC

"Imagine doing [the job] when you're covering three people's bleeps when you're in a ward that's got 50 per cent of the nurses, where five of your colleagues are missing.

"The reason I left is that I had a very bad day at work... I worked on a labour ward and all you ever want is a healthy mum and a healthy baby and this was a day when I ended up with neither and I was the most senior person there. I just realised I didn't have the emotional exoskeleton to deal with the job.

"I couldn't face that happening ever again."

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